Reproductive hazards of industrial chemicals.
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Reproductive hazards of industrial chemicals. by F. M. Sullivan

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Published by Academic Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Human reproduction.,
  • Chemicals -- Toxicology.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsBarlow, S. M.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP251
The Physical Object
Pagination(620)p.
Number of Pages620
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14939366M
ISBN 100126762503

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Examples of Chemical Reproductive Hazards. Examples of chemicals classified as reproductive hazards include: acrylonitrile, benzene, chloroform, dimethyl formamide, ethidium bromide, mercury, methylene chloride, and zinc chloride. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) provide information regarding reproductive hazards of chemicals.   Reproductive Hazards of the Workplace is designed to help managers, primary care physicians, and health and safety professionals manage and prevent occupational reproductive risks. Like other entries in Van Nostrand Reinhold’s Hazards of the Workplace series, the book offers a wealth of valuable, up-to-date information plus expert-tested Cited by: OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY 4 Appendix A Chemical Exposures and Reproductive Hazards Chemical Exposure Monitoring Based on the results of the workplace evaluation, OES may monitor employee exposures levels for any chemicals of concern, especially those with evidence of reproductive toxicity. The.   The future challenge for reproductive toxicologists in both the industrial and environmental settings is the integration of high-throughput technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to prioritize the many thousands of industrial chemicals with little or no reproductive hazard information.

Dealing with reproductive hazards in the workplace is an increasing concern. Chemical and biological reproductive hazards affect both men and women. Material safety data sheets are one source of information regarding reproductive hazards of a particular substance. Information on specific chemicals and organisms is available in a booklet from EH&S. The office also provides. This profile of chemical agents and their reproductive toxicities permits a qualitative determination that fire fighters are exposed to potential reproductive toxicants as a part of their normal fire fighting duties. , Reproductive hazards of fire fighting I. Non‐chemical hazards, American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 19, 4, ( Though most workplace chemicals have not been studied for reproductive effects, there are some known workplace exposures you should be aware of. Female reproductive hazards can be chemical, physical or other workplace conditions that affect the reproductive health of women and their ability to become pregnant. Reproductive hazards of industrial chemicals: an evaluation of animal and human data. London: Academic Press. Bloom AD, Paul NW, eds. Guidelines for studies of human populations exposed to mutagenic and reproductive hazards: proceedings of conference sponsored by Centers for Disease Control and March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation.

Although some specific reproductive hazards have been identified in humans (e.g., lead, solvents, and ionizing radiation), most of the more than 1, workplace chemicals that have shown abnormal reproductive effects in animals have not been studied in humans. Reproductive Hazards of Industrial Chemicals. Susan M. Barlow, & Frank M. Sullivan, Academic Press: New York (). Chemical Hazards to Human Reproduction. Council on Environmental Quality, prepared by Clement Associates, Inc., January (). Artist Beware: The Hazards and Precautions in Working with Art & Craft Materials. Reproductive Hazards of the Workplace is designed to help managers, primary care physicians, and health and safety professionals manage and prevent occupational reproductive risks. Like other entries in Van Nostrand Reinhold's Hazards of the Workplace series, the book offers a wealth of valuable, up-to-date information plus expert-tested. In general, it is unusual for reproductive toxic effects to be observed at otherwise non-toxic doses. It seems likely that reproduction hazards from industrial chemicals will not be very common but, where they do occur, may be of great importance.