Alcestis (Greek Tragedy in New Translations)
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Alcestis (Greek Tragedy in New Translations) by Euripides

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Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsWilliam Arrowsmith (Translator)
The Physical Object
Number of Pages136
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7385933M
ISBN 100195018613
ISBN 109780195018615
OCLC/WorldCa91986274

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  Alcestis: A Novel by Katharine Beutner reminds me that a book is a relationship, and mine have always been complicated. I despise the world Ms. Beutner created for the young Alcestis. Her mother was dead, her father remained remote and cruel, and the servants were dull/5(25). "Alcestis" is the oldest surviving play of Euripides, although he had been writing tragedies for almost twenty years when it was written. Apparently it ws the fourth play in a tetralogy, taking the place of the ribald satyr play which traditionally followed a series of three tragedies/5(5). The Catholic University of America Speech and Drama Department presents Euripides' "Alcestis," translated by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald, directed by James D. Waring. Choral interpretation by Dr. Josephine McGarry Callan. Setting and lighting by . Alcestis, in Greek legend, the beautiful daughter of Pelias, king of Iolcos. She is the heroine of the eponymous play by the dramatist Euripides (c. – bce). According to legend, the god Apollo helped Admetus, son of the king of Pherae, to harness a lion and a boar to a chariot in order to win.

APOLLO Dwelling of Admetus, wherein I, a God, deigned to accept the food of serfs! The cause was Zeus. He struck Asclepius, my son, full in the breast with a bolt of thunder, and laid him dead. Then in wild rage I slew the Cyclopes who forge the fire of Zeus. To atone for this my Father forced me to labour as a hireling for a mortal man; and I came to this country, and tended oxen for my host. Alcestis’s maid comes out, and together she and the chorus leader praise Alcestis’s courage in the face of death. The maid predicts that Admetos won’t understand his loss until it’s too late, and then his life will be filled with bitterness. Soon, Admetos and Alcestis emerge from the palace with their children. Alcestis, drama by Euripides, performed in BCE. Though tragic in form, the play ends happily. It was performed in place of the satyr play that usually ended the series of three tragedies that were produced for festival competition. Learn more about the play in this article. The book ends on this dark note, with Alcestis having nothing to look forward to but eventually dying again. Even this seeming spark of eventual hope is dashed when Alcestis realizes that as a shade in the underworld she won’t be able to recover her youth or beauty – which most likely means she will no longer be appealing to Persephone either.

Euripides’ “ALCESTIS” Produced in BCE at the City Dionysia Awarded 2 nd prize ‘Euripides’ - "Greek Dramas" (p, ): Internet Archive Book Images Home; Download.   Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Alcestis Language: English: LoC Class: PA: Language and Literatures: Classical Languages and Literature: Subject: Alcestis, Queen, consort of Admetus, King of Pherae -- Drama Category: Text: EBook-No. . Synopsis. In The Silent Patient, Alicia Berenson is a well-known painter who murdered her husband six years ago and hasn't spoken a word was found bound to a chair with gunshot wounds to his face, and she was convicted soon thereafter. Theo Faber is a psychotherapist who hopes to treat Alicia and uncover the mystery behind her motives for killing her husband. "The Alcestis would hardly confirm its author's right to be acclaimed 'the most tragic of the poets.' It is doubtful whether one can call it a tragedy at all. Yet it remains one of the most characteristic and delightful of Euripidean dramas, as well as, by modern standards, the most easily actable. And I notice that many judges who display nothing but a fierce satisfaction in sending other.